Sunday, April 29, 2012

Bucyrus steam shovel at Pioneer Park, Fairbanks, Alaska


This is a photo of the old steam shovel at Pioneer Park here in Fairbanks. It was used in the 1920s to build the Davidson Ditch, a 90-mile long aqueduct that brought water from the upper reaches of the Chatanika River to gold dredges near Fairbanks. Supposedly it was used before that on the Panama Canal. I had problems finding a manufacturer's name on it, but did find a plate saying it was made in Evansville, Indians. Based on that I am assuming that it is a Bucyrus. Cool old shovel!

Friday, April 27, 2012

Mining camps merge to form Livengood in 1914

Livengood garage buildings as they looked in about 2000

In the spring of 1914, two Ester miners, Jay Livengood and Nathaniel “Teddy” Hudson, tramped off to the headwaters of the Tolovana River (about 60 miles northwest of Fairbanks) to prospect for richer diggings. The area had been scouted numerous times already, but color was about all that had been found.

Livengood and Hudson found promising paystreaks and staked claims on Livengood, Gertrude and Olive creeks in July and August. They returned to Ester for supplies and then scurried back to the Tolovana with their partners: Michael Beegler, J. C. Kinney, Gus Conradt, George Wheeler and Teddy’s brothers, James and Clifford.

Although this little expedition was supposedly secret, word leaked out and a small stampede headed to the Tolovana. The book, “Livengood, the Last Stampede,” by Audrey Parker, describes four camps that sprang up in the area. Lake City developed three miles below Discovery claim on Livengood Creek (probably near where the Elliott Highway now crosses the creek). Livengood City spread around the creek’s Discovery claim, and Brooks City was just upstream. In addition, Olive City was located on Olive Creek, about two miles to the east.

Olive City and Lake City quickly disappeared when richer diggings were located elsewhere. By the end of 1915, Brooks City (which had merged with Livengood City) was the surviving camp.

The town’s name was shortened to Brooks, but it did not retain that name for long. When residents applied for a post office that same year, postal officials feared that mail bound for Brooks, Alaska, would be confused with mail headed for Brooks, Alabama. Consequently, the town’s name changed back to Livengood.

As with many of Interior Alaska’s mining areas, underground drifting was the principal mining method. Eventually, as in Fairbanks, dredging was introduced. In the late 1930s, Livengood Placers Inc. brought in a dredge similar to ones used by the Fairbanks Exploration Company. Unfortunately, the venture was unprofitable and dredging ceased before World War II. The dredge was eventually moved to the Koyukuk River area. Mining has continued off and on over the years, and by 1990, more than 460,000 ounces of gold had been recovered from Livengood mines.

When Livengood was established, access was via the winding Tolovana River, or a 60-mile trail from Fairbanks. Residents quickly clamored for better access, and, by the fall of 1915, the Alaska Road Commission had pushed through a rough wagon road from Olnes, a stop on the Tanana Valley Railroad just north of Fairbanks. The wagon road was upgraded in the 1930s and eventually extended to Manley Hot Springs in the 1950s. This road is now the Elliott Highway.

The state of Alaska improved the Elliott Highway in the 1970s. Livengood was bypassed in the process and is now about two miles off the highway. The old highway used to wind along the ridges above Livengood Creek before dropping down into town. The cabins in the drawing are at the bottom of the old road coming off the ridge. A friend of mine, whose uncle is a long-time Livengood resident and still mines there, says these cabins used to house the town garage. The upper log cabin was the office, and the lower frame structure was where vehicles were repaired.

Most of the town’s buildings have been destroyed or have fallen into ruins, but there are still enough left to evoke memories of its pioneer days. Please respect private property if you visit.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Ice and leaves - One last post


















Farewell to ice and snow (at least until September). Here are the last two ice photos for a while. I promise! The photos are of birch leaves and catkin scales emerging from the ice in my front yard.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Beechcraft Model 18 aircraft at Pioneer Park, Fairbanks


I was at Pioneer Park (formerly Alaskaland) here in Fairbanks this past Sunday taking photos. Most of the snow is gone but the park was devoid of other people. A great time to take photos. The photo above is of the Beechcraft Model 18 aircraft on display at the Pioneer Air Museum. This particular plane was manufactured in 1943, and saw use as a military navigation trainer (C-45 military designation) before being sold after World War II to Air North for use as a passenger and cargo plane. That is a Wright R-2600-35 radial engine in the foreground.

After taking the photo of the plane at Pioneer Park, I realized I had another photo in my files--this one of a Beachcraft Model 18 on floats. The photo below was taken years ago at Boy Scout Island on Eyak Lake, near Cordova
.

Monday, April 23, 2012

Home improvements - Frontier Alaska style

Spring (before the leaves appear) is a great time to take photos of old buildings. I walked around some of the older sections of Fairbanks today taking pictures. This building, near the Chena River on First Avenue, had long fascinated me. The lot it sits on is only slightly wider than the house, so it has been added on to lengthwise over the years. According to Fairbanks North Star Borough land records, the earliest portion of the house (the log cabin) dates to 1910.

Saturday, April 21, 2012

Cobbles. leaves and melting ice - Fairbanks, Alaska


Much of the snow is gone from around Fairbanks, but it still persists in shaded areas, like the north side of my house and along streams. My north yard is a native species garden and I took some photos of the melting ice in the water course there. I enjoy the patterns made by the ice as it melts from around the cobbles and leaves.

Friday, April 20, 2012

Ester’s assay office: A little building that survived

Ester Assay Office in 1993

Many people are familiar with the hotel and Malemute Saloon at Ester Gold Camp. But how many have paid any attention to the small frame-building on the northeast corner of the gold camp property? Most other buildings on the property were built after 1930, but this little cabin was probably constructed about 1906, soon after Ester, Alaska was established.

Thousands of miners flooded into the Fairbanks area after the 1902 discovery of gold on Pedro Creek. Gold was found on Ester Creek in 1903 and the small community of Ester City sprang up in 1904. Within a few years Ester had three hotels, five saloons plus other businesses, and a population of several hundred people.

As with most small towns around Fairbanks, the richest diggings around Ester began to play out fairly quickly. Ester’s population dwindled in tandem with gold production, but the little town hung on.

The Fairbanks Exploration Company began acquiring claims and doing exploratory drilling along Ester Creek in the mid-1920s in preparation for large-scale dredging. The company moved its Dredge No. 6 from Goldstream to Ester Creek and began dredging in the early 1930s. It built a mess hall/bunkhouse and related buildings in 1933 to support its Ester operations, and also acquired existing buildings such as the one shown in the drawing (which was used as an assay office).

Dredges float in their own little ponds, and the dredges (plus their ponds) slowly move along as the gold-bearing gravel is excavated. In this manner Dredge No. 6 gradually moved from Ester to Eva Creek, and then floated to Gold Hill via a specially constructed canal. In the winter of 1959 a stripped-down Dredge No. 6 (still weighing 680 tons) was pulled overland to Sheep Creek by 18 tractors.

With the dredge relocating to Sheep Creek, the Ester facilities were no longer needed. The camp was sold in 1958 and the new owners turned the property into a resort. The bunkhouse/mess hall was converted to a hotel, and one of the other camp buildings (also believed to date back to 1906) was refurbished as the Malemute Saloon.

The saloon’s special attraction was that half the bar counter came from the Royal Alexandra hotel in Dawson City. The other half of the bar was stored in a nearby building. This was fortuitous, since the saloon burned down in 1969. The Malemute was rebuilt and the other half of the bar was installed.

Ester Gold Camp is still much the same as it was when the FE Co. sold it. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1987. The little building that served as the company assay office is still there. I can’t find records of what its use was before the FE Co. acquired it, but it was probably moved to the site from another location. Since the camp passed into private ownership, the assay building has seen many different uses, including snack shop, ticket booth and gift shop. I think it’s a lovely little frame building, typical of the early 1900s when construction materials were in short supply.

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Elegant husks - Wild iris seed pods in Fairbanks, Alaska



















Its spring-time, when most gardeners' minds (at least in Alaska) are on getting the planting beds ready, buying seeds, and looking forward to this year's flower blossoms. My mind, however, still dwells on what remains of last year's flowers--the stalks and seed pods of flowers such as iris and larkspur. I find the seed pods very beautiful all by themselves. These are photos of the wild Alaska iris (Iris setosa) in my yard. The pods are still full of seeds, waiting to be distributed by the wind or passing animals.


Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Pussy Willows blooming in Fairbanks


Breakup! One of my favorite times of the year. Sure--its wet and messy. Giant pot holes open up in front of you as you drive down the road and mufflers bloom by the wayside. But the pussy willows are also blooming!

Monday, April 16, 2012

Angelmorphosis 14 - Fallen angel

Angel at 10 am 4-15-2012
Well, yesterday was the day. The angel is no more. By mid morning the angel--which had transformed into a goose the day before--was transformed into an ostrich. By mid-afternoon she had toppled over and broken into pieces.

Angel at 3 pm 4-15-2012
As ridiculous as it may seem, while contemplating the demise of the sculpture, the last few lines from Shelley's poem "Ozmandius" came to mind.  

"Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away."









Sunday, April 15, 2012

Angelmorphosis 13 - From C-clamp to long-necked goose

Angel at 10 am 4-13-2012
Angel at 5 pm 4-13-2012


















Yesterday and today brought the angel into the realm of modern art. She-it is now (as my 3-Dimensional Design class instructor would say) a highly penetrated mass. Sort of reminds me of work by artists such as Henry Moore.

Angel at 10 am 4-14-2012
Angel at 6 pm 4-14-2012


















My wife said yesterday's form reminded her of a C-clamp. This afternoon's form looked like a goose looking back over its should according to her.

Today may be the angel's last day. (Of course I've been saying that for the past several days.) But the angel is now precariously perched on just one corner of her base. Water was literally pouring off her today. I think she will either collapse entirely tonight, or at least the upper portion will fall. We shall see.

Check out the other posts in this series:

Angelmorphosis 1 
Angelmorphosis 2 
Angelmorphosis 3 
Angelmorphosis 4 
Angelmorphosis 5 
Angelmorphosis 6 
Angelmorphosis 7 
Angelmorphosis 8 
Angelmorphosis 9  
Angelmorphosis 10 
Angelmorphosis 11
Angelmorphosis 12 
Angelmorphosis 14

Saturday, April 14, 2012

Angelmorphosis 12 - And going, and going...

Angel on 4-11-2012

Angel on 4-12-2012



















I'll have to admit, the angel (if you can still call it that) has more staying power than I imagined. The base had been melting faster on the eastern (morning) side of the sculpture, so it has been leaning over at an increasing angle. I thought it would have toppled by now.


The other side of the angel


Check out the other posts in this series:

Angelmorphosis 1 
Angelmorphosis 2 
Angelmorphosis 3 
Angelmorphosis 4 
Angelmorphosis 5 
Angelmorphosis 6 
Angelmorphosis 7 
Angelmorphosis 8 
Angelmorphosis 9  
Angelmorphosis 10 
Angelmorphosis 11
Angelmorphosis 13
Angelmorphosis 14

Friday, April 13, 2012

Manley's Northern Commercial Company store filled with memories


Northern Commercial Company store in Manley Hot Springs

Manley Hot Springs (usually just called Manley) is located west of Fairbanks, about 75 miles as the raven flies. But if you want to travel there by car you drive north to Fox, northwest to Livengood, and then southwest to Manley Hot Springs, a total of about 160 miles. Most of the way you travel through the White Mountains via the Elliott Highway (named for Malcolm Elliott, president of the Alaska Road Commission from 1927 to 1932).

The town is at the end of the road. (Well almost the end of the road. Manley sits on the banks of a Tanana River slough, and the highway continues three miles to Tanana River Landing.) Manley is a small village of about 100 people, but a century ago it boasted 500 residents.

According to the Alaska Division of Community and Regional Affairs, the community was established in 1902 when a prospector named John Karshner discovered the hot springs and started a homestead and vegetable farm. The United States Army built a telegraph station there as part of the Washington-Alaska Military Cable and Telegraph System (WAMCATS) at about the same time. The community was originally called Baker's Creek (after a nearby creek) but quickly became know just as "Hot Springs," and it soon became a supply and community center for miners from the nearby Eureka and Tofty areas to the north. Farms in the area produced fresh meat and produce for the hungry miners.

Frank Manley built the Hot Springs Resort Hotel in 1907. (The town was officially renamed Manley Hot Springs in 1957.) His resort attracted visitors from all over Interior Alaska. Guests could be dropped off by riverboat at the Tanana River landing, or they could take the two-day overland stage from Fairbanks.

The town prospered by supplying the mines and catering to the hot springs guests, and the Alaska Commercial Co. decided to open a store there. The book, “Flag over the North, the Story of the Northern Commercial Company,” tells of the A.C. Company owning a string of trading posts and stores across Alaska, as well as a navigation and transportation operation. It became the Northern Commercial Co. in 1922, and sold groceries and general merchandise in its stores. 

In many small settlements, the N.C. Co. store also acted as the post office, social center and bank. It was no different in Manley, especially after the resort burned to the ground in 1913. As with many of the smaller towns in Interior Alaska, the area's population withered after the Gold Rush, declining to about 30 residents by 1920. The N.C. Co. store in Manley remained open until the mid 1960s when declining population forced it to close. The illustration shows the store front in 1994, when there were still goods sitting on some of the store's shelves.

Today the town has one seasonal hotel (Manley Roadhouse), laundromat with showers, gas station, school post office, museum and grocery store. The hot springs still flow, and I understand that a couple of local residents run a greenhouse with water from the springs. For the right price you can soak in hot tubs inside the greenhouse surrounded by exotic (for Alaska) foliage. It would be a nice way to end a day in a small Alaska village filled with memories and friendly people.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Angelmorphosis 11 -Going, going...

Angel on 4-9-2012
Angel at 10 am, 4-10-2012


















It has been warm the last few days. Our morning newspaper says yesterday was the first day since October that the temperature exceeded 50 degrees F. The angel changed rapidly yesterday. I don't know if she will survive much longer.

Angel at 5 pm, 4-10-2012
Angel at 7 pm, 4-10-2012


















Check out the other posts in this series:

Angelmorphosis 1 
Angelmorphosis 2 
Angelmorphosis 3 
Angelmorphosis 4 
Angelmorphosis 5 
Angelmorphosis 6 
Angelmorphosis 7 
Angelmorphosis 8 
Angelmorphosis 9  
Angelmorphosis 10 
Angelmorphosis 12
Angelmorphosis 13
Angelmorphosis 14

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Alaska-Siberia Lend-Lease Memorial and Ladd Field, Fairbanks


When I wrote my post about construction of the Alaska Highway I mentioned the “Northern Staging Route,” the series of airfields through which military aircraft were ferried from the U.S. to the Soviet Union during World War II.

Since I broached the subject I thought I would share a photograph of the Alaska-Siberia Lend-Lease Monumenthere in Fairbanks, and some photos I took years ago of the historic area at Ladd Field (now Fort Wainwright).

The bronze sculpture of two WW II pilots was produced by Juneau artist, Richard T. Wallen. The project was spearheaded by the Alaska-Siberia Research Center, a non-profit organization based in Juneau, and the sculpture was dedicated in 2006. It commemorates the Lend-Lease program during World War II through which almost 8,000 military aircraft were ferried for the United States, via Canada and Alaska, to Siberia and the war fronts in the western Soviet Union.

Hanger No. 1
Ladd Field was the transfer site for the aircraft.  U.S. pilots ferried the planes from Great Falls, Montana to Fairbanks, and Soviet pilots flew the planes from there to Siberia.  Hanger No. 1 on Fort Wainwright was built in 1941 and was the only hanger at the field for two years.  The field is a National Historic Landmark.
 

Administrative Center
 Other buildings around the “Quadrangle” were also built in 1941, and additional facilities were added between 1942-1945. The buildings around the Quadangle included Officers Quarters, Commanding Officer’s Quarters, and an Administrative Center (now Murphy Hall).

Quadrangle looking north from Hanger No. 1
 I'm working on a drawing of Hanger No. 1 and when that is finished I'll write in more detail about Ladd Field and the Northern Staging Route.

Sunday, April 8, 2012

Angelmorphosis 10 - Rough around the edges

Angel on 4-7-2012
Angel on 4-8-2012



















The temperature for the last two days continued  to get up into the mid-40 degree F. range. So, of course, the angel continued to diminish. Here wings are definitely getting ragged, and her head hardly warrants being called a head. From the west it's outline is only vaguely head-like. From the east it looks more like a long necks sans head.

Angel's other side 4-8-2012
Check out the other posts in this series:

Angelmorphosis 1 
Angelmorphosis 2 
Angelmorphosis 3 
Angelmorphosis 4 
Angelmorphosis 5 
Angelmorphosis 6 
Angelmorphosis 7 
Angelmorphosis 8 
Angelmorphosis 9 
Angelmorphosis 11
Angelmorphosis 12 
Angelmorphosis 13
Angelmorphosis 14





Friday, April 6, 2012

Angelmorphosis 9 - drastic weight loss

Angel on 4-5-2012
Angel on 4-6-2012



















Last couple of days have been getting up to almost 50 degrees F. The angel is certainly slimming down. Yesterday afternoon she lost her upper arms. Tomorrow she just might lose her head. Then she would be the Alaska equivalent of the "Winged Victory of Samothrace."

Angel's other side 4-6-2012
Check out the other posts in this series:

Angelmorphosis 1 
Angelmorphosis 2 
Angelmorphosis 3 
Angelmorphosis 4 
Angelmorphosis 5 
Angelmorphosis 6 
Angelmorphosis 7 
Angelmorphosis 8 
Angelmorphosis 10
Angelmorphosis 11
Angelmorphosis 12
Angelmorphosis 13
Angelmorphosis 14  

Dot Lake community grew from Alaska Highway construction camp


Dot Lake Community Chapel

Dot Lake, located about half way between Tok and Delta Junction on the Alaska Highway, is a picturesque little town on the east shore of Dot Lake. The community did not really exist until the Alaska Highway was constructed, but the area has a long record of human habitation. An archeological excavation recently conducted by the University of Alaska at Healy Lake (about 35 miles northwest of Dot Lake) uncovered evidence of human habitation dating to 11,500 years before present. 

Athabascan Indians, who have occupied the area for thousands of years. were semi-nomadic. They moved cyclically, depending on the season and availability of resources, and trapped in the Dot Lake area during the winter.

The Tanana River is about ¼ mile to the north, and Dot Lake is on an old Indian freight trail along the river. According to the State of Alaska, by 1924 the Alaska Road Commission (ARC) had built an improved winter trail (called the Tanana Crossing-Grundler Trail) from Big Delta (near present-day Delta Junction) to Tanacross (about 35 miles southeast of Dot Lake). This trail probably went by the Dot Lake site.

When the Alaska Highway was constructed in 1942-43, a construction camp called Sears City was established at Dot Lake. As an interesting aside, most of the Alaska Highway was built by U.S. Army Corps of Engineer troops working side by side with private contractors. However, the section of highway between Tok and Delta Junction was one of the few segments of the highway built solely by a private contractor.

Several of the local Athabascan men worked on the project, and after World War II ended, some Athabascan families began moving to Dot Lake from Sam Lake and Lake George (about 12 miles and 18 miles to the northwest), and from Tanacross. A brochure available at the chapel states that the first Athabascan family to settle at Dot Lake permanently was the Peter Charles family.

Non-Natives also started moving to the area, beginning in 1947 when Fred Vogel acquired several of the cabins used by the Alaska Highway construction crews. It was Vogel who started the lodge at Dot Lake. Stanley Buck, a Christian missionary who also worked for the ARC, began holding services at the Dot Lake lodge at about the same time. Eventually, as the village’s population grew, residents decided to build a church. In 1949 a small chapel was constructed on skids next to the lodge and then moved to its present location next to the lake.

By 1952 the community had grown large enough that the Territorial Department of Education was persuaded to send a teacher to Dot Lake. In return for the Territory providing text books and a teacher, the community agreed to construct a school and provide desks. That first school building sits behind the chapel. The State of Alaska built a new school long ago, and for many years the original school building was used as the church parsonage.

With today’s paved highway and more fuel efficient vehicles, fewer road travelers stop at Dot Lake than in years past. The gas station is closed, and the former lodge is now a private residence and contract post office. The community is still worth stopping at, though, even if it is just to take photos of the lake (I saw swans there last summer) and visit the Dot Lake Community Chapel.


Thursday, April 5, 2012

Angelmorphosis 8 - the change intensifies

Angel on 4-2-2012
Angel's face 4-2-2012



















Temperatures are starting to warm up again, and the angel is beginning to show significant changes.

Angel on 4-3-2012

Angel's face 4-3-2012



















It has been especially interesting watching her face. First her face flattened out and she lost her nose. Then she actually grew lips.

Angel on 4-4-2012
Angel's face 4-4-2012



















Now with the warmer weather, the angel is actually regaining facial features. (Of course, I have only been showing you one side of the angel. The other side of the face, which catches the sun for most of the day, it totally unrecognizable.


Check out the other posts in this series:

Angelmorphosis 1 
Angelmorphosis 2 
Angelmorphosis 3 
Angelmorphosis 4 
Angelmorphosis 5 
Angelmorphosis 6 
Angelmorphosis 7
Angelmorphosis 9 
Angelmorphosis 10 
Angelmorphosis 11
Angelmorphosis 12
Angelmorphosis 13
Angelmorphosis 14  

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Known and suspected colorblind artists - a list


Frank Dunne cartoon of a Digger
 Known and Suspected! That makes us sound sinister, doesn't it?

Here is a listing of some artists who are colorblind—gleaned from a few days research on the Internet. It is admittedly a limited list for several reasons. First, the short amount of time I did the research in. Second, the list is, for the most part, limited to artists willing to admit that they are colorblind. Third, I have restricted the list to artists with a web presence so you can see their art.

This listing is for all those colorblind people interested in art and wondering how (or if) they can fit into the world of art. I was once in that same situation.

I did not plan on becoming an artist. In fact, after realizing in high school that I was partially colorblind, I shied away from any activity that might involve using color. I stumbled into art during college, taking an introductory art class and enjoying it immensely. I realized that the process of art was in a way, much like the process of science—a system to view and explore the world.

I was hooked on art and could not give it up. However, I still wondered if I could make it as a colorblind artist. This was 40 years ago and I felt like I must be the only person struggling with this issue. I did not realize that colorblind people have been working in the arts for—well probably as long as there has been art.

This list mostly includes living artists. I have also listed some deceased artists known and suspected to have been colorblind. A word of caution though—much of the evidence for a deceased artist having been colorblind is circumstantial, usually based on their use of a restricted color palette. However, there are other reasons for using restricted color palettes besides colorblindness. I think the point to take away is that any artist can be successful using a restricted palette.

Anyway, for what it is worth, here is the list:

Saeed Akhtar (1938-) Contemporary Pakastani figurative painter, instructor at National Arts College in Lahore, Pakistan
 
Caesar D. Alzate Jr. – Contemporary California artist, works primarily as a caricature artist.
http://www.zhibit.org/caesar_alzate_jr

Wayne Ashworth – Contemporary English illustrator and painter

Arthur Burdett Frost (1851-1928) -- American illustrator and painter. Known to be colorblind.
http://www.jewelriverart.com/category/bierstadt.arthurburdettfrost/


John Lindley Byrne (1950-),  British-born Canadian American comic book author and artist. Has worked on some of most iconic superhero series such as X-men and Hellboy.

Paul C├ęzanne (1839-1906) – French Post-Impressionist painter. Diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 51 and probably developed diabetic retinopathy, which can cause red-/green colorblindness.
 
John Constable (1776-1837) – English landscape painter. Suspected of being colorblind.

David M. Cook -- contemporary NYC graphic artist

Royce Deans – Contemporary Michigan abstract and figurative painter
 
Ethan Findley Diehl (1927- ) – Contemporary Texas figurative painter

Frank Dunne  (1898-1936) – Australian cartoonist and illustrator. Known to have been colorblind.

Tony Garner – Contemporary English landscape painter

Jamie Hayes – Contemporary New Orleans illustrator and painter

Justin Heller  – Contemporary New Jersey abstract painter

Ferdinand Leger (1881-1955) – French Cubist and Modernist painter. Suspected of being colorblind.
 
Tennessee Loveless -- Contemporary California Pop/Op artist

Paul Manship (1886-1966)--American Art Deco sculptor, Known to be colorblind.
http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/manship_paul.html

 Charles Meryon (1821-1868) -- French printmaker. Known to be red/green colorblind
 http://www.ralf-dahm.com/index.php?id=44
 
Piet Mondrian (1872-1944) – Dutch abstract painter. Suspected of being colorblind.

Clifton Ernest Pugh (1924–1990) – Australian landscape and figurative artist. Known to have been colorblind.
 
Lloyd Rees (1895-1988) - Australian landscape painter, suspected of being colorblind
 
Greg Schwab – Contemporary Lousianna wildlife and landscape painter

Christopher Smart – Contemporary Florida marine painter

Nick G. Smith – Contemporary Texas watercolor and landscape painter

Aaron Sutton – Contemporary Florida landscape painter

Mark Teel – contemporary Kansas comic book artist and art teacher

Albert Uderzo (1927-) – Contemprary French illustrator of Asterix comics.

Martha Weston (1947-2003) – California  illustrator, illustrated over 60 children’s books
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2003/09/06/BA283192.DTL

If you know of any other colorblind artists that should be on my list let me know.